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DEPLOYING AND TESTING JUNO


Once Juno separates from the last rocket stage, its solar arrays unfold, allowing it to capture the sunlight that gives it life. Over the next few weeks, Juno’s other components and scientific instruments are turned on and tested to ensure they’re working properly.    

After launch, mission engineers will spend a few weeks checking all of Juno’s systems. Following this initial checkup, engineers will turn on and test the spacecraft’s science instruments. While Juno spends the next year cruising around the Sun, it will have regular checkups from mission controllers to ensure it’s in good health throughout its voyage.


  • WHY DOES JUNO SPIN?

    In space, it’s easier for objects to spin than not to spin.


  • WHAT IF JUNO RUNS INTO TROUBLE?

    Juno is designed to handle some problems on its own.


  • DEEP SPACE MANEUVER

    In August 2012, Juno fired its main engine to adjust its course, putting it en route for an Earth flyby about a year later.


  • HOW BIG IS JUNO?

    The spacecraft is probably bigger than you think.


  • SOLAR ARRAYS UNFURL

    The moment when the solar panels unfold is critical.


  • MAGNETOMETER

    The magnetometer is one of the most important scientific instruments on board.


  • WHY DOES JUNO’S SHAPE MATTER?

    Three large solar arrays are evenly spaced around Juno to balance its spin.


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Earth Flyby